Monday, May 9, 2011

HASTUR

HASTUR

"I found myself faced by names and terms that I had heard elsewhere in the most hideous of connexions—Yuggoth, Great Cthulhu, Tsathoggua, Yog-Sothoth, R’lyeh, Nyarlathotep, Azathoth, Hastur, Yian, Leng, the Lake of Hali, Bethmoora, the Yellow Sign, L’mur-Kathulos, Bran, and the Magnum Innominandum—and was drawn back through nameless aeons and inconceivable dimensions to worlds of elder, outer entity at which the crazed author of the Necronomicon had only guessed in the vaguest way."
H.P. Lovecraft, The Whisperer In Darkness

"Nov. 17, '21. Utterly alien landscape. Not of earth so far as I know. Black heavens, some stars. Crags of porphyry or some similar substance. Foreground a deep lake. Hali? In five minutes the water began to ripple where something rose. Facing inward. A titanic aquatic being, tentacled. Octopoid, but far, far larger-ten-tenty times larger than the giant Octopus apollyon of the west coast. What was its neck was alone easily fifteen rods in diameter. Could not risk chance of seeing its face and destroyed the star."

"And then, from out of the darkness of the cavern's well, an eldritch head showed dimly. Then, as it thrust forth, I almost screamed aloud in horror,- for the face was a ghastly travesty on everything civilized; it rose from a neckless body which was a mass of jelly-like flesh, rubbery to the eye, and the tentacle which adorned it took rise from that area of the creature's body which was either its lower jaw or what passed for a neck"
H.P. Lovecraft & August Derleth, The Gable Window


5 comments:

  1. Interesting design. But why the arms? I think, Hastur looks to humanlike with them.

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  2. I wanted him to look similar to my Cthulhu drawing considering some people connect them in the mythos...and Hastur does appear in human guises throughout the mythos.

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  3. Now I want a version of Hastur as The King in Yellow! Keep up the amazing work.

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  4. I don't know when, but I do plan on getting to him as he's described in Dream-Quest

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  5. Lovecraft never actually used Hastur in his stories, other than that oblique mention in Whisperer. By the way, Bethmoora was a mysteriously abandoned city in a Dunsany story of the same name. The Magnum Innominandum has something to do with Chaugnar Faugn, as "The Horror from the Hills" uses a fragment Lovecraft wrote. The Roman message used that term.

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